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Guidelines for Contributors

[Revised June 1999; updated November 2000]



I. Aims and Objectives of the Project


1. The scope of the Register is as follows:

(i) The Register will aim at identifying all written sources which were incorporated, quoted, translated or adapted anywhere in the texts, English or Latin, defined in (ii) below.
(ii) Texts are defined as works (or parts of works) which were written, or are likely to have been written, in Anglo-Saxon England, including those by foreign authors; and works (or parts of works) which were written abroad, certainly or arguably by Anglo-Saxons, or by foreigners who were drawing mainly on materials which they had obtained, or are likely to have obtained, in Anglo-Saxon England.
(iii) Anglo-Saxon England is defined as England up to 1066.
(iv) A text will be sourced whether it is extant in a pre-1066 copy or only in a later one.
(v) A work, or part of a work, written after 1066 will be sourced if it is of a type characteristic of England before 1066 (i.e. if it is likely to reflect experience of Anglo-Saxon resources in books and education).
(vi) An immediate source is defined as the work in which the material took the form used in the text in question.
(vii) An antecedent source is defined as a work which was drawn on, whether immediately or not, by the author of an immediate source.
(viii) An identifiable source will be recorded whether or not it is extant.
(ix) Oral sources and book lists will be excluded.

2. (i) The management of the project consists of two Executive Directors, responsible respectively for Anglo-Latin and Old English, who are themselves accountable to a Management Committee. The Directors have sole discretion about allocating texts for sourcing to contributors.

(ii) A contributor must submit entries in the approved format (as specified below) for inclusion in the Register, stored electronically. The Register is under the supervision of the Database Director and the Database Editor. The latter is responsible for ensuring consistency of format of the entries. Responsibility for the content of entries remains with the contributors.

(iii) A contribution to the Register accepted by the Directors will be entered under the name of the contributor, and every effort will be made by the Management Committee to ensure that any use made of the information supplied will be accompanied by an acknowledgement to the contributor by name, and to a previous scholar, or scholars, if appropriate.


II. Preparation of Contributions


1. A contribution to the Register must take the form outlined in this guide, and must be presented in electronic format, together with hard copy, unless prior arrangement has been made with the Database Editor. The contribution should be in two tables, header (which identifies the text) and entry (which identifies the source or sources). The header record and entry record(s) are intended together to identify as completely as possible a source, or sources, for a whole text as defined in I.1(ii) above (e.g. the Old English Bede). Each item in a series (e.g. a homily in a set of homilies) is to be treated as a whole text for this purpose.

2. Each record in the entry table, relating to a specific portion of text, will record

(i) the results of existing scholarship which has not been superseded, with acknowledgement of the debt to the scholar(s) concerned in the header table or entry table;
or (ii) the results of new work by the contributor taking due account of earlier scholarship;
or (iii) a combination of (i) and (ii).

3. Each record in the Register will end with the date of entering. After a contribution has been incorporated in the Register, the Directors will still be able to accept supplementary or amending entries.

4. The Register is now stored using Access 97. Contributions should be made on a 3.5" disk, formatted for a PC. Files should be text-only (ASCII). For Old English special characters, use @ = æ, % = þ [thorn], / = ð [eth]. It should be possible to handle contributions on a variety of word-processing and database packages (e.g., Word, Word for Windows, WordPerfect, Works, MacWrite, other Access databases, Paradox 3.x, 4.x, or 5.x, Lotus 1-2-3, dBase III, IV or V), but contributors should contact the Database Editor in advance.

5. Allocation of reference numbers

Three related code numbers help to key the information in the database, and should be included in all submissions. [See also 6 and 7 below]

(i) Each header must be provided with a text reference. For a text in Old English, the text reference is the Cameron number (in Frank and Cameron 1973), prefixed `C', and for a text in Latin the Lapidge number (to be published), prefixed `L'. Examples: C.B.2.5.1 [Wulfstan's Canons of Edgar]; L.A.1.3 [Aldhelm's Carmen de uirginitate].

(ii) Each entry must be provided with an entry reference. The entry reference is the text reference supplemented by a three-digit entry number. Entries are numbered in sequence following the chronology of the text. Examples: C.B.2.5.1.001 [entry no. 1, Canons of Edgar]; L.A.1.3.211 [entry no. 211, Carmen de uirginitate].

(iii) Each source passage listed for each entry must be provided with a source reference. The source reference is the entry reference supplemented by a two-digit source number. Examples: C.B.2.5.1.001.02 [entry no. 1, Canons of Edgar, second source]; L.A.1.3.211.01 [entry no. 211, Carmen de uirginitate, first source].

Note: These conventions must be followed exactly. The entry number always consists of three figures and the source number always consists of two figures. There are no spaces in any reference numbers. Cameron (and Lapidge) numbers have A, B, C etc followed by a point before the first numeral.


6. Header table


6a. Each contribution, whether providing only one entry record or a set of two or more, must include a header table. If you are using a word-processing package, your header table should be laid out as follows (anything in square brackets need not be typed):

[Field name]

[Example]

[H1]

Text reference

L.A.1.3

[H2]

Text author

ALDHELM

[H3]

Text title

Carmen de uirginitate

[H4]

Text edition

Ehwald 1919

[H5]

Contributor

Andy Orchard

[H6]

No. of entries

456

[H7]

Transmission

[nothing to report]

[H8]

Bibliography

Manitius 1886; Orchard 1994

Submissions should include the field name followed by a single tab, with only one carriage return or paragraph-marker per field. This is particularly important with regard to the more discursive parts of the table, e.g. H7 and H8 above. Where there is nothing to report in a particular line (for example, H7 above), type the field name followed by a single tab and one carriage return.

 

Database format:

[Field name]

[Field size]

[Data type]

Text reference

18

Text

Text author

30

Text

Text title

100

Text

Text edition

40

Text

Contributor

25

Text

Entries

 

Number

Transmission

254

Text

Bibliography

254

Text

 

 

Notes on completing the header table

6b. H2. Text author. The author's name should be in upper case, using ANON (OE) or ANON (Lat.), if none is known. Such forms as Pseudo-Wulfstan should be avoided. (Do not use here the abbreviations prescribed in Abbreviations for Sources.)

6c. H3. Text title. The title of the text should be in the form used in the letter of agreement which you have received from the appropriate Director. (Do not use here the abbreviations prescribed in Abbreviations for Sources.)

Usually the text will have been written in England by an Anglo-Saxon author. If, however, this is not the case (see I.1(ii) above), prefix the title of the text with whichever of the following sigla is appropriate:

Sigil

Meaning

&

a work written certainly or arguably by a foreign author in England

a work written certainly or arguably by an Anglo-Saxon abroad

*

a work by a foreign author writing abroad but drawing mainly on materials which he had obtained, or is likely to have obtained, in Anglo-Saxon England

A fourth sigil is also available:

Sigil

Meaning

!

a work tentatively included in the Register for the sake of completeness, pending further investigation

This sigil can be used with or without any of the other three. In the former case, place it immediately after the other sigil.

6d. H4. Text edition. The edition specified should be agreed with the appropriate Director, using either author-date or series and volume number, adding page or item numbers where necessary. In the case of an unpublished work, specify the manuscript version being sourced, and give folio and line references, as prescribed below.

[NOTE: full bibliographical details of the text edition must be submitted with your entries (see 11 below)]

6e. H7. Transmission. Use this space for very brief information (maximum of 60 words) about the transmission of an immediate source to the author who drew on it, or on the possible relationship of alternative sources, or about the likely relationship of an antecedent source to an immediate one, if you wish to avoid repeating a statement in several entries (see also 10a below). For instance, you might wish to state that, in your view, probably the whole of an immediate source was not known to the author in question, but only a part of it included, without alteration, as an item in a florilegium; or that the author knew an immediate source included, without alteration, as an item in a particular collection such as the homiliary of Paul the Deacon.

It is emphasized strongly that it is not permissible to include any argument supporting or qualifying your statements regarding transmission. If an argument supporting your statement has been made in an item in your bibliography in H8, it is sufficient to draw attention in the Transmission field of the header table to the existence of that argument. If your work for the Register gives rise to argument regarding transmission, you should publish such argument elsewhere and include reference to it in the bibliography. If you are submitting entries before publication of that argument, you may make additions to the bibliography at any time with a supplementary submission.

6f. H8. Bibliography. References to publications which have provided new information about any sources which you are citing should be listed here, in the form prescribed below. If a publication deals with only one entry, or only a few, it is permissible to list it only in the Bibliography field of the entry table for those entries. You should not include publications which have only referred to sources which had already been established by earlier commentators, but you should include any study which has pinpointed more exactly, or qualified, or made more certain, previously published information. If in doubt, be inclusive rather than exclusive. [See also 10b below]

References to source-studies cited in the header table or in the entry table should be in the form Bately 1980, the relevant page numbers being added where appropriate. In the case of writers who have published more than one relevant item in any year, items are lettered in sequence, e.g. Cross 1979a, Cross 1979b. Follow the precedent in the Secondary Bibliography on the database if there is one, otherwise supply your own letters.

 


7. Entry Table


Each entry consists of a particular phrase or passage of the text being sourced and its corresponding source-passage, together with various identifying features and comment. If you have a further source for the same passage, make a separate record using the same entry reference number and location details but a different source reference number. Do not create overlapping entries, e.g. one for lines 1-20 and another for lines 15-30 or lines 10-12 (if you need to cite a further source that applies only to a specific part of the passage and it is not feasible to divide the passage differently, and you think guidance is essential, a note in the Comment field can be used to guide the reader).

7a. Each entry requires a separate record. If you are using a word-processing package, your entry table should be laid out as follows (anything in square brackets need not be typed):

[Field name]

[Example]

 

Record Number

452

[E1]

Text reference

C.A.1.1.1

[E2]

Entry reference

C.A.1.1.1.034

[E3]

Entry location

line 1145

[E4]

Entry quotation

s@dberendes sethes lice

[E5]

Source reference

C.A.1.1.1.034.01

[E6]

Source author

HIER.

[E7]

Source title

Interpr.hebr.nom.

[E7a]

Source item number

[Not applicable]

[E8]

Source edition

CCSL 72

[E9]

BS number

[Not applicable]

[E10]

BHL number

[Not applicable]

[E11]

Source location

10.13

[E12]

Source quotation

semen

[E13]

Sigil

SA1

[N1]

Comments

Follows Jerome's interpretation of Seth's name, `semen'

[N2]

Bibliography

Robinson 1968a, 29-30

[N3]

Manuscripts

[nothing to report]

Submissions should include field names followed by a single tab, with only one carriage return or paragraph-marker per field. This is particularly important with regard to the more discursive parts of the table, e.g. N1 above. Where there is nothing to report or an item is not applicable in a particular line (for example, E10 or N3 above), type the field name followed by a single tab and one carriage return.

 

Database format:

[Field name]

[Field size]

[Data type]

Text reference

18

Text

Entry reference

20

Text

Entry location

50

Text

Entry quotation

80

Text

Source reference

25

Text

Source author

40

Text

Source title

60

Text

Item number

50

Text

Source edition

40

Text

BS number

3

Text

BHL number

12

Text

Source location

50

Text

Source quotation

80

Text

Sigil

5

Text

Comments

254

Text

Bibliography

254

Text

Manuscripts

254

Text

 

 

Notes on completing the entry table

7b. For E1 Text reference, E2 Entry reference, and E5 Source reference, see 5 above.

Entries should be numbered consecutively.

 

7c. E3. Entry location.

Length of a passage sourced in a single entry

An entry should not extend beyond a section of moderate length in your edition (or manuscript) of the text sourced (e.g. a chapter of the Old English Bede or of Alfred's translation of the Regula pastoralis). You should begin a new entry at the opening of each such section, whether or not a change of source would cause you to do so at that point. If there are no sections in the edition (or manuscript) you are using, or if they are too short or too long to be suitable, you may determine your own divisions.

You should also make a separate entry each time it is established that there is a change of immediate source, or of an antecedent source if no immediate source has been established. If the author of your text returns to an immediate source (or antecedent source in the circumstances just mentioned) which he has used before, you should start a fresh entry as though the source were new. Discontinuous passages of a text that draw upon the same source (or antecedent source, if known) should not, therefore form part of the same entry unless the intervening wording is insignificant. Interpretation of what is significant is left to the discretion of individual contributors. The following notes may, however, be of help:

(i) Intervening wording may be significant if, for example, it forms an unsourced discrete unit of thought, such as an explanatory etymology or `gloss', which, according to your adopted version of a source, has been introduced into an otherwise continuously close rendering of this source, e.g. in Alfred's translation of the Regula pastoralis, the words `ðæt is on ðæm fuluhte' (Sweet's edition, p.85, lines 15-16) which follow `ða æðelu ðære æfterran acennesse' (line 15), rendering Gregory's `nobilitatem ... intimae regenerationis', trigger a fresh entry beginning with Sweet line 16 `ond symle atiewe'.

(ii) If, however, there is a small point of detail or wording not from a source (i.e. a phrase or short clause), there is no need to make a separate entry unless the intervening wording can itself be shown to be derived from a different source. In instances where an author has used more than one source and where the blending of ideas from those sources is such as to make it difficult to disentangle the sources phrase by phrase, more than one source may be cited for the passage. (This also applies where a passage has a single immediate source but a number of antecedent biblical sources; see further 8b below.)

7d. E3. Entry Location

Enter exact references to where the passage sourced in the entry concerned occurs in the edition or manuscript cited in H4 of the Header. For a text which is line numbered as a unit in the edition cited, enter line numbers only, as in the example above in 7a. (For more than one line, use the conventions 1-22, 15-16, 23-4, 124-6.) For a text in which sections (e.g. books or chapters) are line numbered separately, enter the sectional division followed by a point followed by line number(s), without spaces, e.g. 1.3-6. Note: sectional divisions should be cited in arabic, whatever convention the edition cited uses. For a text numbered by page or not provided with line numbers in the edition cited, enter page and line, e.g. 26.1-15 or 37.6-39.4. For instruction on citing manuscripts, see 12 below.

7e. E4. Entry quotation. Quote the opening and closing words of the passage (no more than five in each case) to make identification exact, with ellipses between,

e.g. `seo s@ ... wi/meten'.

Reproduce the spelling of the edition or manuscript concerned, but not its accent marks, punctuation or capitals; expand all abbreviations silently, including `7' as `and' or `ond'. Any other quotation of wording, e.g. to support an attribution of a source, is not permissible.

7f. E5-11. Sources other than the Bible

Make a separate entry for each source for a passage identified in E2. The sources may be immediate or antecedent, or an analogue. If two or more discontinuous parts of a work are used continuously as an immediate source for the passage identified in E3 (or as an antecedent if no immediate source is identified - see below), each part should be treated as a separate record, unless the intervening wording in the source is insignificant.

If you think that your author has formed the passage in E3 by blending ideas from more than one immediate source (or more than one antecedent source if no immediate source is identified), or if you are unable to decide which of two or more works has been used as an immediate source for it (or has provided an antecedent in the circumstances just mentioned), enter each source separately (on a separate record), with an appropriate sigil (see 9 below).

It is recognized that there will be many cases in which it will be possible to identify only an antecedent, and not an immediate, source. In all other circumstances you should cite antecedents very sparingly, as it is not the purpose of the Register to trace ideas back as far or as thoroughly as possible.

An analogue should be cited only if it indicates that a written source, which is now unknown or lost, once existed. For instance, normally you should not record an analogue if both an immediate source and an antecedent are identified, unless citation of it identifies a definable stage between the immediate and antecedent sources.

7g. E6. Source author. The author's name, or ANON if none is known, should be entered in upper case. Use the abbreviations as directed in Abbreviations for Sources or in the Primary Bibliography on the database. Use a point after abbreviated forms apart from ANON, but not after names used in full (e.g AVG. and GREG.MAG. but HAYMO and BEDA). For anonymous texts traditionally (but wrongly) attributed to a particular author, the author may be cited as ANON.PS.ISID. For texts traditionally assigned to one author but now assigned to another, the author may be cited in the form EPIPH.(PS.CASSIOD.), meaning a work formerly attributed to Cassiodorus but now assigned to Epiphanius.

7h. E7 and E7a. Source title and item number. The title of the work should be entered using the abbreviations as directed in Abbreviations for Sources or in the Primary Bibliography on the database. Do not cite here subdivisions of the work. For individual letters and homilies in collections, give the general source title (e.g. Epist. or Hom.) and add the item number in arabic (e.g. 2 or 2.2) in the item number field. Commentaries, however subdivided, are treated as single works (thus for Augustine's Tractates on John the source title is Tract.euang.Ioan. and the tractate number is given in the source location field).

[NOTE: for guidance, see the location examples and related reference comments in the Primary Bibliography on the database]

If you are citing a text which is not included in the Abbreviations for Sources or in the Primary Bibliography on the database, use the established abbreviations as a model. The following general rules apply:

i) Abbreviate the first noun, ignoring de, in, etc. (e.g. De Fide is Fid.).

ii) Generic abbreviations should be used wherever possible, especially for anonymous works: comm. for a commentary, vit. or pass. or act. for hagiography (= vita, passio, acta), symb. (= symbolum) for creeds, orat. (=oratio) for prayers, epist. (=epistola) for letters, hom. (=homilia) for homilies, serm. (=sermo) for sermons.

iii) Use Latin titles for Latin works wherever possible.

If in doubt, consult the Database Editor.

7i. E8. Source edition. Recommended editions for source texts can be found in the Abbreviations for Sources or, failing that, in the Primary Bibliography on the database, giving the prescribed abbreviations. You should use these editions unless there are strong reasons for citing a different one (e.g., that it contains a version closer to the Anglo-Saxon text). For numbered series such as PL or CCSL (listed at the front of Abbreviations for Sources and in the Primary Bibliography on the database) cite the series (in abbreviated form) and volume number only, e.g. PL 102 or CCSL 123; otherwise cite editor (surname only) and date (e.g., Bately 1980), adding the volume number in the case of a multi-volume collection containing many texts (e.g. hagiographic collections). The item number or page numbers of the whole text should be added only if this is necessary to locate the text in question in a multi-text volume (e.g., Birch 1887 no.454 or ASS Iul, 5, 344-350). In the case of a source for which an edition is not specified in the list, you should select the appropriate edition in consultation with the Director in question.

If the source text exists only in manuscript, enter MS followed by a brief version of the shelf-mark (e.g. MS.Paris BN.lat.11561) under source edition and give the manuscript details in the Manuscript field. If it exists in print but you have evidence that a manuscript not used for the edition contains a version of the source that is in some respects closer to that used by the Anglo-Saxon author, cite the printed version for source edition and location etc. and (for those entries where it is relevant) cite the manuscript in the Manuscript field, using the Comment field to give additional information or to quote variant readings. For the format used to cite a manuscript, see 12 below.

[NOTE: if you are citing a source edition that is not already listed in the Primary Bibliography on the database, full bibliographical details of the source edition must be submitted with your entries; see 11 below]

7j. E10. BHL number. For hagiographic sources, enter the number given in Bibliotheca Hagiographica Latina (2 vols., Brussels 1898-1901; Subsidia hagiographica 6); with supplements in 1911 (Subsidia hagiographica 12) and 1986 (Subsidia hagiographica 70). [On BS numbers see 8 below]

7k. E11. Source location. Exact reference to the relevant passage, by page and line, or folio and line, or book and line, or in other standard form, should be given following the examples in 7a above or precedent in the Primary Bibliography on the database. Note: The use of roman numerals is not permitted. Where more than one reference system is in use in the edition, cite wherever possible the line numbers and the divisions on which the line-numbers depend (i.e. page and line or chapter and line). In the absence of line numbers, cite page numbers unless the text is divided into very short numbered sections.

[NOTE: if you are using a source text that is not already listed in the Primary Bibliography on the database, an explanation of the reference system you are using to cite a source passage must be submitted with the bibliographical details for the edition; see at 11 below ]

7l. E12. Source quotation.Quote the opening and closing words of the passage identified in E11 (no more than five words in each case) to make identification exact. Reproduce the spelling of the edition or manuscript concerned, but not its accent marks, punctuation or capitals; expand all abbreviations silently, including `&' and `7' as `et' or `and' or `ond'. Note In the rare instances where an antecedent source is cited when an immediate source has been identified, there is no need to cite the opening and closing words of the antecedent source unless it is necessary in order to identify the passage.

Citing source quotations from manuscripts: Where a record cites only the incipit and explicit of a source quotation from a manuscript, but the full quotation is known to be available in print (e.g. in a source study), then the contributor should indicate in the bibliography field (if printed in a source study) or in the comment field (if printed in a study other than a source study) where the full text of the source passage can be found. [EXAMPLES: Comment field: Text in Bately 1980; Bibliography field: Baker and Lapidge 1995, 269 (incl. text).]

Citing texts in non-Latin characters: When citing texts in non-Latin characters (e.g. Greek), the source quotations should be transliterated. Diacritical marks (e.g. macrons) should not be used. Since the purpose of citing the incipit and explicit of a source passage is to facilitate identification of the text, the precision of the reference location is crucial in these circumstances.

 

 

8. Biblical Sources

8a. These are treated somewhat differently from other sources and should be cited as follows:

[E6]

Source author: BS [= Biblia sacra]

[E7]

Source title: the biblical book, using the abbreviations listed at the beginning of Abbreviations for Sources, or in the Primary Bibliography on the database or in Appendix A below, e.g. Gn for Genesis (note that there is no point after the abbreviation).

[E8]

Source edition: reference should be made to Biblia sacra iuxta vulgatam versionem, ed. R. Weber (2nd ed., Stuttgart, 1975), with the exception of the Roman Psalter, for which reference should be made to Le Psautier romain et les autres anciens psautiers latins, ed. R. Weber (Rome 1953); abbreviate as: Weber 1975 and Weber 1953, respectively.

If there is good reason to use another edition (e.g., Weber 1983 or 1994), alert the user to this in a comment.

[E9]

BS number: give the code number for the particular book of the Bible as given in the list below (See Appendix A below).

[E11]

Source location: the chapter and verse in arabic, e.g. 2.4 or 3.5-8

[E12]

Source quotation: leave blank

[E13]

Sigil: as usual (see 9 below)

8b. In contrast to other kinds of sources, Biblical quotations or paraphrases should always be cited, whether they are immediate sources or only antecedent, i.e. taken from another source which quoted or paraphrased Biblical verses. Use the sigil to show that it is antecedent (i.e. SA1). The Bible is an immediate source if the author of the text in question quotes it without taking the quotation over from another source, or if he takes the quotation over from another source but alters it in a way that shows independent knowledge of Scripture; the Bible is an antecedent source if the author takes over a quotation of it from another source without a change that shows independent knowledge of Scripture.

8c. If the quotation in question is used more than once in the Bible and you cannot tell which instance the author was using, cite the one most likely or the first in order and indicate the alternative(s) in a comment.

8d. If a Biblical passage cited as an immediate source shows readings which agree with another version of the Bible against the Vulgate, cite the wording under source quotation, in round brackets.

If a passage from the Psalms cited as an immediate source shows readings which indicate one psalter version rather than another (i.e. among Roman, Gallican and Hebrew), indicate the appropriate version, e.g. PsRom, PsHebr, PsGall; note that Ps alone indicates that the psalter version is unspecified. [Use Biblia sacra iuxta vulgatam versionem ed. R. Weber (Stuttgart, 1975) for the Gallican and Hebrew psalter, and Le Psautier romain et les autres anciens psautiers latins ed. R. Weber (Rome, 1953) for the Roman psalter.]

 

9. Sigla

9. E13. Sigil. Every source entry must conclude with a sigil (and only one) indicating the status of that source in the view of the contributor. With the exception of analogues (indicated by SX or MX), the sigil should be composed of a letter or letters and a number (e.g. S1, SA2, M3, MA2) and, where necessary, a further code (`a' or `o').

The meaning of the sigla is as follows:

S

single immediate source

SA

single antecedent source

SX

single analogue

M

multiple source (one of two or more immediate sources cited for the passage)

MA

multiple antecedent source (one of two or more antecedent sources)

MX

multiple analogue (one of two or more analogues)

1

certain

2

probable

3

possible

a

`and' (= in addition to another source that is cited)

o

`or' (= alternative to another source that is cited)

Where more than one immediate source is cited for a particular passage, contributors should use M rather than S; where appropriate they may add the further codes a (= `and') or o (= `or') to indicate whether sources are jointly used or are cited as alternatives.

Examples:

Sigil for an entry with a single source:

Sigil

Meaning

S1

certainly an immediate source

S2

probably an immediate source

S3

possibly an immediate source

 

SA1

certainly an antecedent source

SA2

probably an antecedent source

SA3

possibly an antecedent source

 

SX

an analogue

 

Sigil for an entry with more than one source:

Sigil

Meaning

M1a

certain source, used in combination with another

M2a

probable source, used in combination with another

M3a

possible source, used in combination with another

 

M1o

one of two or more sources, one of which was certainly used

M2o

a probable source, but alternatives are cited

M3o

a possible source, but alternatives are cited

MA1

one of two or more antecedent sources, certainly used

 

Where two or more sources are cited for a single entry, the relative probabilities of their use can be suggested by their respective sigla:

M1a, M2a

two sources combined, the first certain, the second probable

M1a, M3a

two sources combined, the first certain, the second possible

M2o, M3o, M3o

three sources, the first probably used, or possibly one of the others

M2o, M3oa, M3oa

three sources, the first probably used, or possibly the others combined

 

Note: The use of brackets, as advocated in earlier versions of the Guidelines, has now been abandoned.

 

Notes on the allocation of sigla

(i) The distinctions between `certainty', `probability' and `possibility' expressed by the sigla apply only within each of the categories and not between categories. For example, S2 indicates that a source is probable, not that it is probably an immediate source rather than an antecedent. Cases of uncertainty between categories may be indicated briefly in the Comments section of the entry table. If, for instance, you are uncertain whether a particular work was an immediate source of your text or itself drew on the immediate source (whatever that was) - i.e. whether the work in question is to be regarded as an immediate source or an analogue - you should adopt the type of sigil (S or SX in this example) which you think best and report in the Comments section of the entry table that the uncertainty about the category exists.

(ii) It is to be assumed that users of the Register will take for granted that there is an element of judgement in all allotment of sigla.

 

10. Additional notes

10a. N1. Comments. Enter here information about the transmission of an immediate source to the author, or about the likely relationship of an antecedent source to an immediate one, if the information is specifically related to the entry in question and has not already been entered in the header table (see 6e); or any necessary statements about your allocation of sigla; or any brief points you wish to make about the relationship of text to source. Remember to keep submissions in this field brief.

10b. N2. Bibliography. References included here should be more pointed (i.e. to specific pages of any work specified in the bibliography to the header, H8) or to works relevant only to the individual entry and not to the text as a whole. For the form of reference, see 6f (H8 Bibliography) above.

10c. N3. Manuscripts. If you have evidence that the edited version you are citing is less close as a source than a version preserved in an extant manuscript, or group of manuscripts, you should expand your reference to the edition by citing the closest manuscript here according to the format for citing manuscripts in 12 below.

 

11. References to books and articles

Draw up as a separate list, with full bibliographical details, and submit with your entries:

(i) any source-texts and editions which you cite in your entries, as agreed with the appropriate Director, apart from those already listed in the Primary Bibliography and the Bibliography of Anglo-Saxon texts on the database; if you are using a source text that is not already listed in the Primary Bibliography on the database, an explanation of the reference locations (e.g. page and line or book and verse) you are using to cite a source passage must be submitted with the bibliographical details for the edition (see also 6d, 7i and 7k above).

(ii) any studies of sources which you have cited in the header or notes apart from those already in the Secondary Bibliography on the database (see also 6f above).

 

12. References to manuscripts

A reference to a manuscript in section H7 of the Header Table (Transmission) or in N3 of the Entry Table (Manuscripts) should consist of:

(i) the place, the name of the library and the manuscript shelf mark
(ii) whenever possible, within brackets, the manuscript's origin, date and provenance

The information should be laid out according to the following models:

London, British Library, Royal 1. B. 7 (?Northumbria, s. viii[1]; prov. Christ Church, Canterbury);
Brussels, Bibliothéque Royale, 1650 (Abingdon, s. xi in.);
Cambridge, Corpus Christi College 178, pp. 1-270 (s. xi[1]; prov. Worcester);
Durham, Cathedral Library, B. 4. 9 (s. x med.)

When a folio reference is called for, it should be modelled on the appropriate example among the following: fols. 9-18; fols. 16-18; fols. 22-4; fols. 32-46; fols. 209-16; fols. 17 and 19; 43r-46r; 104v-106r; 144r-152v; 17r and 24v.

 

 

 APPENDIX A: Abbreviations and Code Numbers for Biblical Books (BS numbers)

Genesis

Gn

01

Exodus

Ex

02

Leviticus

Lv

03

Numeri

Nm

04

Deuteronomium

Dt

05

Iosue

Ios

06

Iudicum

Idc

07

Ruth

Rt

08

1 Samuel

1 Sm

09

2 Samuel

2 Sm

10

3 Reges

3 Reg

11

4 Reges

4 Reg

12

1 Paralipomenon (Chronicles)

1 Par

13

2 Paralipomenon (Chronicles)

2 Par

14

1 Ezras

1 Esr

15

2 Ezras

2 Esr

16

Tobias

Tb

17

Judith

Idt

18

Hester (Esther)

Est

19

Iob

Iob

20

Psalmi (Romanum)

PsRom

21

Psalmi (Gallicanum)

PsGall

22

Psalmi (unspecified)

Ps

22

Psalmi (Hebraeum)

PsHebr

23

Proverbia

Prv

24

Ecclesiastes

Ecl

25

Canticum canticorum

Ct

26

Sapientia

Sap

27

Sirach (Ecclesiasticus)

Sir

28

Isaias

Is

29

Hieremias

Ier

30

Lamentationes (Threni)

Lam

31

Baruch

Bar

32

Hiezecihel (Ezechiel)

Ez

33

Danihel

Dn

34

Osee (Hosea)

Os

35

Iohel

Ioel

36

Amos

Am

37

Abdias (Obadiah)

Abd

38

Ionas

Ion

39

Micah

Mi

40

Naum (Nahum)

Na

41

Abacuc (Habbakuk)

Hab

42

Sofonias (Zephaniah)

So

43

Aggeus (Haggai)

Agg

44

Zaccharias (Zechariah)

Za

45

Malachi

Mal

46

1 Machabaeorum

1 Mcc

47a

2 Machabaeorum

2 Mcc

47b

Mattheum

Mt

48

Marcum

Mc

49

Lucam

Lc

50

Iohannem

Io

51

Actus apostolorum

Act

52

Romanos

Rm

53

1 Corinthios

1 Cor

54

2 Corinthios

2 Cor

55

Galatas

Gal

56

Ephesios

Eph

57

Philippenses

Phil

58

Colossenses

Col

59

1 Thessalonicenses

1 Th

60

2 Thessalonicenses

2 Th

61

1 Timotheum

1 Tim

62

2 Timotheum

2 Tim

63

Titum

Tit

64

Philemonem

Phlm

65

Hebraeos

Hbr

66

Iacobi

Iac

67

1 Petri

1 Pt

68

2 Petri

2 Pt

69

1 Iohannis

1 Io

70

2 Iohannis

2 Io

71

3 Iohannis

3 Io

72

Iudae

Iud

73

Apocalypsis

Apc

74

Oratio Mannasse

OrMan

75

3 Ezrae

3 Esr

76

4 Ezrae

4 Esr

77

Psalmus 151

Ps cli

78

Epistula ad Laodicenses

Laod

79

 

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Page created 24 May 2001